Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and families celebrated

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families and children are being celebrated in organizations, schools and communities across the country today to mark Children’s Day, 20 years on from the landmark Bringing them Home report.

2017-Aboriginal-Childrens-Day-LOGOMinister for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships Mark Furner says it was fitting the theme for this year’s Children’s Day was Value Our Rights, Respect Our Culture, Bring us Home.

“This year, Children’s Day holds extra meaning, recognizing the 20th anniversary of the Bringing them Home report which exposed appalling human rights violations through the Stolen Generations.”

“The national day presents an opportunity to celebrate the significant role community, culture and family play in the life of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children.

“It’s important for all Australians to come together – not just today, but every day – to learn more about our history and show our respect and recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and strong family connections.”

Held on 4 August each year, National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day originated in 1988 as a day to celebrate children living away from families in orphanages and institutions.

Since then, Children’s Day has grown every year, becoming a major event in the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children, families and community organizations.